Importance of communication with professors

How do you communicate with your teachers outside of class time?  Does the average college student check their email as often as they check their Facebook, Snapchat or Instagram feeds?  I know they don’t check it as often as their texts, but I wouldn’t expect them to.As a 44-year-old non-traditional college student at DMACC, I check my personal/business every 15-20 minutes (and my DMACC address every couple hours) and use it as my base of operations of getting things done during the day.  On the other side of the equation, my daughter who is a freshman at UNI prefers to text everything to me, and I have to ask her regularly to send it to my email since that’s what I work on during my day.

As a 44-year-old non-traditional college student at DMACC, I check my personal/business every 15-20 minutes (and my DMACC address every couple hours) and use it as my base of operations of getting things done during the day.  On the other side of the equation, my daughter who is a freshman at UNI prefers to text everything to me, and I have to ask her regularly to send it to my email since that’s what I work on during my day.I asked a couple professors at DMACC how they best communicate with their students outside of scheduled class time.  While they appear to prefer in-person communications with their open office hours, students are relying on email to reach out to their instructors instead.

I asked a couple professors at DMACC how they best communicate with their students outside of scheduled class time.  While they appear to prefer in-person communications with their open office hours, students are relying on email to reach out to their instructors instead.Lynn LaGrone, Associate Professor of English, says “I don’t limit my contact hours via email because I check continually throughout the day which makes it more accessible.  I also use Blackboard extensively in my classes with the hope that students grow to rely on it for course updates, supplemental materials, and communication. Students often complain that a class is cancelled or moved, etc, and they weren’t aware of it— but the reality is, the instructor sent an email and/or posted an announcement on Blackboard to let them know and they never checked it.”

Lynn LaGrone, Associate Professor of English, says “I don’t limit my contact hours via email because I check continually throughout the day which makes it more accessible.  I also use Blackboard extensively in my classes with the hope that students grow to rely on it for course updates, supplemental materials, and communication. Students often complain that a class is cancelled or moved, etc, and they weren’t aware of it— but the reality is, the instructor sent an email and/or posted an announcement on Blackboard to let them know and they never checked it.”Andrew Neuendorf, Associate Professor of English and Literature said “Direct notification through mobile application is the most effective form of communication/addiction known to humankind.”  He continues to say “We should be investigating all viable and legal ways to make students’ pockets beep, buzz, and/or vibrate”

Andrew Neuendorf, Associate Professor of English and Literature said “Direct notification through mobile application is the most effective form of communication/addiction known to humankind.”  He continues to say “We should be investigating all viable and legal ways to make students’ pockets beep, buzz, and/or vibrate”On the other side of things, Jonnadeane Laughlin, an Elementary Education major from Des Moines says she likes email and checks every day.  Syndey Palek, a DMACC Liberal Arts major, explained that sometimes even via email she doesn’t understand what the teacher’s assignment is.  “If I have a question on something I don’t understand I will use their office hours.  Sometimes it’s just too tough to explain in email.”  They both expressed that they keep their DMACC/school email separate from their other email.

On the other side of things, Jonnadeane Laughlin, an Elementary Education major from Des Moines says she likes email and checks every day.  Syndey Palek, a DMACC Liberal Arts major, explained that sometimes even via email she doesn’t understand what the teacher’s assignment is.  “If I have a question on something I don’t understand I will use their office hours.  Sometimes it’s just too tough to explain in email.”  They both expressed that they keep their DMACC/school email separate from their other email.The business world that DMACC graduates will be moving into runs on email, and they need to get used to it.  Anyone that has an office as part of their job, and many, many others that work out in the field live off of their email, and the students need to get used to communicating that way.

The business world that DMACC graduates will be moving into runs on email, and they need to get used to it.  Anyone that has an office as part of their job, and many, many others that work out in the field live off of their email, and the students need to get used to communicating that way.

As Professor LaGrone summarized for me, “The truth is, it doesn’t matter which format we use to reach out; if students aren’t tuned in to checking regularly, they may miss the boat.”

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